Repost: Words and Roast, Let them Rest!

I’ve got tons of family coming (and some staying for a few days) for Thanksgiving. While I fret over my lack of planning which has now led to a frantic dash to create a clean house, a decent menu plan, and eek out time to grocery shop for everything please enjoy this old post.

Hey, at least I went to the effort of finding a food-related one 🙂

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Making dinner last night I had an epiphany

*Ok, well to be honest, and to further understand the meaning of this post, I have to confess I was merely heating up dinner*

Anyway.

Yesterday, I made a fantastic roast dinner. Big hunk of chuck, russet potatoes, carrots, added water and a variety of seasonings and then topped it all off with three cloves of garlic.

My kids are picky and one is a very slooooow eater, and they even scarfed it up.

So yes, it was delicious.

Now, today was leftover day. Heat up whats left on low and let it simmer for at least half an hour to activate all the goodness, throw some fresh Ciabiattia bread slathered with butter in the oven to get all hot and crispy and you’ve got another great meal.

Anyway.

As I ate tonight, I noticed everything in the roast tasted better. The flavors of the seasoning, meat, veggies, and garlic were no longer totally distinct from the other. It all had mingled together until each bite was savory perfection.

Now is where I circle this back around to writing 🙂

Is it possible that writing could be looked at this in a similar manner?

Figure out your meal plan=getting the “big idea” to your novel

Gather all the ingredients=doing your research, figuring out characters

Prepping the food (cutting veggies, searing meat, etc)=Writing the outline

Actually cooking the meal=First draft

Checking on progress, reseasoning to taste=Revising and rewriting

Leftovers in the fridge=letting your work rest and moving on to other projects, learning more about the craft of writing itself, attending conferences, networking

Being pleasantly surprised by leftovers=You left your draft alone and now all your work is about to pay off on the next round of edits.  You’ve gained the skills needed to fix plot holes, character issues, punctuation and grammar problems, etc…

Ok, I just REALLY took the long way around the barn to make a simple point.

What are your thoughts about letting your work rest while focusing on other writing related activities? Is that part of your writing process?

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3 thoughts on “Repost: Words and Roast, Let them Rest!

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